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Global Governance Update: June 2016

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June 2016

Global Governance Update

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Report Card on International Cooperation, Humanitarian Reform, and Brexit

REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS ARRIVE ON A BOAT ON THE GREEK ISLAND OF LESBOS ON NOVEMBER 7, 2015. (ALKIS KONSTANTINIDIS/REUTERS)

REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS ARRIVE ON A BOAT ON THE GREEK ISLAND OF LESBOS ON NOVEMBER 7, 2015. (ALKIS KONSTANTINIDIS/REUTERS)

Dear Colleague:

On behalf of the International Institutions and Global Governance (IIGG) program at the Council on Foreign Relations, I am excited to announce the launch of the 2016 Council of Councils (CoC) Report Card on International Cooperation. Drawing on the results of a survey taken by leaders of twenty-four top think tanks from around the world, the Report Card evaluates international efforts to address the ten most pressing global challenges, including nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, global health, climate change, and conflict prevention. I invite you to explore the interactive Report Card.

It has been a busy spring for the IIGG program. Ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit, we released a report assessing the shortcomings of the global humanitarian regime and offering recommendations for its reform. In a memo for the Council of Councils, Silvia Colombo of the Italian Institute of International Affairs examines the pitfalls of the European Union’s (EU) deal with Turkey to manage the worst migrant crisis since World War II. The IIGG program also cosponsored the sixth Princeton workshop on global governance, “Challenging Multilateralism and the Liberal Order,” and published a new report that examines the state of global governance and considers how to correct its shortcomings. In the latest installment of the CoC Global Memo Series, Steven Blockmans and Michael Emerson of the Centre for European Policy Studies outline the adverse economic and political consequences of a “Brexit” for the United Kingdom and the EU. Finally, in a new article for the Washington Quarterly, I explore what can be done to reinvigorate the rules of world order.

As we continue to develop new ideas, publications, and tools to illuminate contemporary global issues, we invite you to read our newsletter, explore our website, read my blog The Internationalist, follow me on Twitter, and “like” us on Facebook.

Sincerely, 

Stewart M. Patrick
Senior Fellow and Director, International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Read more about IIGG »

 

Report Card Gives International Cooperation a B Grade
 
A PODIUM AT THE WORLD CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE (COP21) IS PICTURED IN PARIS, FRANCE, ON NOVEMBER 29, 2015. (CHRISTIAN HARTMANN/REUTERS)  

A PODIUM AT THE WORLD CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE (COP21) IS PICTURED IN PARIS, FRANCE, ON NOVEMBER 29, 2015. (CHRISTIAN HARTMANN/REUTERS)

 

In light of recent problems—from disputes in the South China Sea to the threat of the self-proclaimed Islamic State—the world might appear terribly off course. However, the new Council of Councils Report Card on International Cooperation finds that the world has also recorded impressive gains against some of the most difficult global challenges, including climate change and nuclear proliferation. The survey asked heads of CoC member institutes to evaluate international efforts on the ten important challenges in 2015 and rank them in terms of priority and opportunities in 2016. The overall grade was a B, but results varied.

Climate change, nuclear proliferation, and development received the highest grades, due in large part to the adoption of the Paris climate agreement, the Iran nuclear deal, and the Sustainable Development Goals. However, for the second year in a row, three issues—combating transnational terrorism, preventing violent conflict between states, and preventing internal violent conflict—received the lowest marks, even as they were deemed highest priority for 2016. A range of factors help explain the surprisingly upbeat overall assessment, write Stewart M. Patrick and Megan Roberts in World Politics Review, including firm global leadership by the United States and China and the growing willingness of major powers to collaborate on some matters, despite profound disagreement in other areas.

The Report Card was launched at the fifth annual conference of the Council of Councils in New York, where CFR President Richard N. Haass and the heads of three CoC member institutes gathered for a live-streamed discussion on the state of global governance.

For more, visit the interactive Report Card »

 
How to Improve Global Humanitarian Response
 
TURKISH PRESIDENT RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN AND UN SECRETARY-GENERAL BAN KI-MOON SHAKE HANDS FOLLOWING THE CLOSING NEWS CONFERENCE DURING THE WORLD HUMANITARIAN SUMMIT IN ISTANBUL, TURKEY, ON MAY 24, 2016. (MURAD SEZER/REUTERS)  

TURKISH PRESIDENT RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN AND UN SECRETARY-GENERAL BAN KI-MOON SHAKE HANDS FOLLOWING THE CLOSING NEWS CONFERENCE DURING THE WORLD HUMANITARIAN SUMMIT IN ISTANBUL, TURKEY, ON MAY 24, 2016. (MURAD SEZER/REUTERS)

 

The record number of displaced people worldwide, coupled with the protracted nature of the conflicts driving them from their homes, has strained the global humanitarian regime to the breaking point. In anticipation of last month’s World Humanitarian Summit, the IIGG program held a workshop to diagnose the shortcomings of the humanitarian system and propose recommendations for its reform. The burden of hosting refugees falls disproportionately on neighboring countries, which are often fragile states unable to provide essential services. In addition, today’s complex emergencies blur the distinction between those who qualify as refugees in the traditional sense and those who do not, such as “survival migrants” fleeing collapsing governance or famine induced by climate change. The workshop report also highlights the importance of bridging the gap between humanitarian relief and development assistance, and of ensuring that refugees are offered opportunities for education and employment.

As implementation of the EU-Turkey migrant deal proceeds, Silvia Colombo of the Italian Institute of International Affairs writes that the agreement could mark a turning point for Europe as it confronts the greatest refugee crisis since World War II. To achieve success, she argues in a new installment of the CoC Global Memo Series, this initiative should be accompanied by the development of a common European asylum policy and the creation of permanent channels of legal migration to the EU. This is the only way to offer a credible alternative to the irregular migration routes taken by people fleeing conflicts and violence, and to move in the direction of a more moral, sustainable, and secure refugee policy. Read the Global Memo »

 
Challenging Multilateralism and the Liberal Order
 
BAN KI-MOON, SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS, DELIVERS HIS OPENING REMARKS AT THE PARIS AGREEMENT SIGNING CEREMONY ON CLIMATE CHANGE AT THE UNITED NATIONS HEADQUARTERS IN NEW YORK, APRIL 22, 2016. (MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS)  

BAN KI-MOON, SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS, DELIVERS HIS OPENING REMARKS AT THE PARIS AGREEMENT SIGNING CEREMONY ON CLIMATE CHANGE AT THE UNITED NATIONS HEADQUARTERS IN NEW YORK, APRIL 22, 2016. (MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS)

 

New forms of competition and the fraying of the existing global order have limited the ability of international institutions and governments to secure and sustain desired outcomes in addressing global challenges. To examine the state of global governance across a range of issues—including alternate global orders, European integration, global economic governance, and multilateral cooperation in the Middle East—the Council on Foreign Relations, the Stanley Foundation, the Global Summitry Project at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, the Brookings Institution, and the Project on the Future of Multilateralism at Princeton University held the sixth Princeton workshop on global governance. The theme of this year’s workshop was “Challenging Multilateralism and the Liberal Order: What Stance Should the United States Take?” The workshop report notes that the changing social contract between governments and people in countries around the world creates serious challenges for the contemporary global order, while globalization has intensified the need for global cooperation. For more, read the full workshop report »

 
Brexit’s Consequences for the UK—and the EU
 
A WORKER ANSWERS A TELEPHONE IN THE OFFICE OF A BREXIT ADVOCACY ORGANIZATION IN LONDON ON FEBRUARY 12, 2016. (NEIL HALL/REUTERS)  

A WORKER ANSWERS A TELEPHONE IN THE OFFICE OF A BREXIT ADVOCACY ORGANIZATION IN LONDON ON FEBRUARY 12, 2016. (NEIL HALL/REUTERS)

 

The United Kingdom will hold a referendum later this month on whether to remain a member of the European Union. In the latest installment of the Council of Councils Global Memo series, Steven Blockmans and Michael Emerson of the Centre for European Policy Studies argue that a British exit, or Brexit, from the EU could have dire economic and political consequences for both the UK and the EU. A Brexit would spark political instability within the United Kingdom and fan the flames of growing anti-EU sentiment across Europe, as well as deprive the UK of access to the EU single market, damage the UK’s trade ties, and threaten London’s position as a global financial center.

In other recent editions of the Global Memo series, Yasushi Kudo of Japan’s Genron NPO outlines how the Group of Seven (G7) countries could play a leading role in democracy promotion, counterterrorism, sustainable development, and climate change. In another memo, Jorge Chabat of the Mexican Council on Foreign Relations considers whether the recent UN General Assembly special session on the world drug problem could prompt a paradigm shift from prohibition to regulation in the war on drugs. Read the Global Memos »

 
Reinforcing the Rules of World Order
 
THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL HOLDS A MEETING ON THE EBOLA CRISIS AT THE UN HEADQUARTERS IN NEW YORK ON OCTOBER 14, 2014. (EDUARDO MUNOZ/REUTERS)  

THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL HOLDS A MEETING ON THE EBOLA CRISIS AT THE UN HEADQUARTERS IN NEW YORK ON OCTOBER 14, 2014. (EDUARDO MUNOZ/REUTERS)

 

The international rules-based order established after World War II seems to be under relentless pressure, and its foundations are facing existential threat. In a new article for the Washington Quarterly, Stewart Patrick analyzes the merits of pessimistic and optimistic outlooks on the durability of the liberal world order. The sky is not yet falling, argues Patrick, but the turbulence of the past sixteen years, over two very different presidential administrations, suggests little room for complacency. The international rules of order laid down over the past seventy years are fraying, even as rules of the road are needed to address new challenges—such as climate change and cybersecurity—that the architects of the international institutions created in the 1940s could scarcely have imagined. For more, read the full article »

 

ABOUT THE IIGG PROGRAM

The International Institutions and Global Governance (IIGG) program aims to identify the institutional requirements for effective multilateral cooperation in the twenty-first century; propose reforms to strengthen or replace international institutions; and promote effective responses by the United States and its partners to today's daunting global challenges.

 

Stewart M. Patrick
@StewartMPatrick
Senior Fellow and Director

Miles Kahler
@MilesKahler
Senior Fellow for Global Governance

Esther Brimmer
Adjunct Senior Fellow for International Institutions

Megan Roberts
Associate Director

Terrence Mullan
Program Coordinator

Daniel Chardell
Research Associate

Naomi Egel
Research Associate

Theresa Lou
Research Associate

 
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