Marketing Direct Mag - Spam Archive

Also in e.cfr.org

Global Governance Update: UN General Assembly, Global Order and Regionalism, Threatened Wildlife

If you are unable to see the message below, click here to view.

October 2016

Global Governance Update

Blog Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube RSS

UNGA, Global Order and Regionalism, South China Sea, IEA, and CITES

AUSTRALIA'S PRIME MINISTER MALCOLM TURNBULL ADDRESSES THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN NEW YORK, U.S. SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 (EDUARDO MUNOZ/REUTERS).

AUSTRALIA'S PRIME MINISTER MALCOLM TURNBULL ADDRESSES THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN NEW YORK, U.S. SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 (EDUARDO MUNOZ/REUTERS).

Dear Colleague:

It has been a bustling fall season for the International Institutions and Global Governance (IIGG) program at the Council on Foreign Relations. In an article in U.S. News & World Report, Adjunct Senior Fellow Esther Brimmer and I are quoted reflecting on the opening of the UN General Assembly and the challenges facing the United Nations in a world disrupted by greater public distrust of institutions. In a series of blog posts, I evaluate President Barack Obama’s eloquent and wistful final address to the United Nations and examine whether the two special UN sessions on the flood of refugees are all sound and fury. In a new discussion paper series, Senior Fellow Miles Kahler joins five other authors in examining how global and regional institutions compete and cooperate across global finance, trade, development, human rights, and peace operations. In a recent Foreign Affairs article, Naomi Egel and I argue that the approach of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to integrating rising powers holds lessons for the reform of other global institutions seeking to remain relevant. Finally, in recent installments in the Council of Council Global Memo series, Euan Graham of the Lowy Institute for International Policy assesses The Hague tribunal’s South China Sea ruling, and Romy Chevallier and Ross Harvey of the South African Institute of International Affairs examine the necessities and difficulties in addressing illegal wildlife trade through multilateral action.

As IIGG continues to develop new ideas, publications, and tools to illuminate contemporary global issues, we invite you to read our newsletter, explore our website, read my blog The Internationalist, follow me on Twitter, and “like” us on Facebook.

Sincerely, 

Stewart M. Patrick
Senior Fellow and Director, International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Read more about IIGG »

 

Successes, and Missed Opportunities, at the UN General Assembly
 
U.S. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA ADDRESSES THE UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016 (MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS).  

U.S. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA ADDRESSES THE UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016 (MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS).

 

World leaders launched the seventy-first session of the UN General Assembly in New York two weeks ago. The event featured a high-minded speech by President Obama, who, like UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, was attending his final General Assembly. The mood in the hall was somber, reflecting a world in extraordinary turbulence, as Stewart Patrick observed in an article in U.S. News & World Report. In the same piece, Esther Brimmer emphasized that international leaders should remake the case for the importance of the United Nations in people’s daily lives. UN leaders attempted to do this in part by convening two special sessions to address the flood of refugees and migrants from global conflict zones—and by making promises to alleviate their suffering. Unfortunately, as Patrick argues, international efforts to meet unprecedented humanitarian needs continue to fall short. In another recent blog, IIGG Associate Director Megan Roberts recommends that the next UN secretary-general push for a timely, competitive, and merit-based recruitment model for senior UN personnel. For more, visit The Internationalist »

 
Global Order and the New Regionalism
 
TANGENT EARTH MARBLES. (FDECOMITE/FLICKR).  

TANGENT EARTH MARBLES. (FDECOMITE/FLICKR).

 

Regional institutions and initiatives have proliferated in the twenty-first century. This latest wave of regional innovation raises, in new guise, a long-standing conundrum for global order and U.S. foreign policy: When is regional organization a useful, even essential, complement to the ends of global governance—financial stability, an open trading system, sustainable development, robust protection of human rights, and the end of civil wars—and when does it threaten or undermine the achievement of those goals? In a new discussion paper series published by the Council on Foreign Relations, Miles Kahler, senior fellow for global governance, joins five other authors in examining these dilemmas across several issue areas: finance, trade, development lending, human rights, and peace operations. Each author suggests ways in which the new regionalism can be harnessed to serve global purposes and the contribution that U.S. policy can make to those ends. For more, read the full discussion paper series here »

 
The Hague Tribunal Rules on the South China Sea
 
PHILIPPINE MARINES FOLD A PHILIPPINE NATIONAL FLAG DURING A FLAG RETREAT ON THE BRP SIERRA MADRE, A MAROONED TRANSPORT SHIP IN THE DISPUTED SECOND THOMAS SHOAL, PART OF THE SPRATLY ISLANDS IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA, MARCH 29, 2014. (ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS)  

PHILIPPINE MARINES FOLD A PHILIPPINE NATIONAL FLAG DURING A FLAG RETREAT ON THE BRP SIERRA MADRE, A MAROONED TRANSPORT SHIP IN THE DISPUTED SECOND THOMAS SHOAL, PART OF THE SPRATLY ISLANDS IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA, MARCH 29, 2014. (ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS)

 

The July ruling by The Hague’s Permanent Court of Arbitration on the dispute brought by the Philippines against China has earned its place in the annals of maritime law. Its precedent will be felt far beyond the South China Sea, but whether it will influence China is open to question. Euan Graham of Australia’s Lowy Institute for International Policy assesses the legal and strategic factors likely to shape this contentious dispute going forward, including possible areas for fostering cooperation, in a new installment of the CoC Global Memo Series. 

In a blog post for The Internationalist, Patrick explains why the U.S. stake in the oceans goes well beyond the South China Sea. The dramatic deterioration of the world’s oceans—a catastrophe exacerbated by global warming—demands global attention. With this end in mind, Secretary of State John Kerry welcomed representatives from some sixty countries to the third Our Ocean conference. The gathering aimed to turn the tide by adopting innovative, collaborative approaches to rescuing the marine environment. To read more, visit The Internationalist »

 
The International Energy Agency's Hybrid Model
 
A WORKER INSPECTS SOLAR PANELS AT A SOLAR DUNHUANG, 950 KILOMETERS (590 MILES) NORTHWEST OF LANZHOU, GANSU PROVINCE, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 (CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS).  

A WORKER INSPECTS SOLAR PANELS AT A SOLAR DUNHUANG, 950 KILOMETERS (590 MILES) NORTHWEST OF LANZHOU, GANSU PROVINCE, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 (CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS).

 

In an article for Foreign Affairs, Naomi Egel and Patrick argue that the International Energy Agency’s incremental approach to integrating rising powers holds lessons for the reform of other global institutions seeking to remain relevant. International organizations are notoriously slow to adapt to changing circumstances. Yet the IEA, the most prominent energy-focused multilateral institution, has begun to show signs of life. Since 2011, it has been quietly expanding its tent to partner with emerging economies in ways that promise to bring economic, environmental, and geopolitical benefits to developed states and developing countries alike. This approach should help restore the agency’s centrality in the fragmented realm of global energy governance. For more, read the Foreign Affairs article »

 
Can Multilateral Efforts Save Threatened Wildlife?
 
AN ELEPHANT AND HER YOUNG ONE ARE SEEN DURING THE AERIAL CENSUS AT THE TSAVO WEST NATIONAL PARK WITHIN THE TSAVO-MKOMAZI ECOSYSTEM, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 (THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS).  

AN ELEPHANT AND HER YOUNG ONE ARE SEEN DURING THE AERIAL CENSUS AT THE TSAVO WEST NATIONAL PARK WITHIN THE TSAVO-MKOMAZI ECOSYSTEM, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 (THOMAS MUKOYA/REUTERS).

 

Countless wildlife species are being pushed toward extinction by habitat loss and illegal trade, endangering the planet’s biodiversity. Last week, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) opened in Johannesburg. Unfortunately, limiting trade in wild animals and plants can be a contentious process that depends as much on politics as on science. Romy Chevallier and Ross Harvey of the South African Institute of International Affairs use the debate over elephant conservation to elucidate the stakes and challenges of preserving endangered species, arguing that it holds lessons for improving the functioning of CITES and reconciling conflicting positions among nations. For more, read the Global Memo »

 

ABOUT THE IIGG PROGRAM

The International Institutions and Global Governance (IIGG) program aims to identify the institutional requirements for effective multilateral cooperation in the twenty-first century; propose reforms to strengthen or replace international institutions; and promote effective responses by the United States and its partners to today's daunting global challenges.

 

Stewart M. Patrick
@StewartMPatrick
Senior Fellow and Director

Miles Kahler
@MilesKahler
Senior Fellow for Global Governance

Esther Brimmer
Adjunct Senior Fellow for International Institutions

Megan Roberts
Associate Director

Terrence Mullan
Program Coordinator

Theresa Lou
Research Associate

 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 


© 2016 All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0, except where otherwise stated | .gov.uk email communications

Email gcs@cabinet-office.gsi.gov.uk | GCS - 020 7276 2295

Marketing Direct Mag - © Crown copyright | All printing supplied by PrintUK.com | Part of Spamdex - the spam archive for the internet

E-Marketing Madness

We have helpful advice from marketing experts across the globe, learn their tips and tricks and make your company more successful.