Marketing Direct Mag - Local & Central Government Emails Archive

Central & Local Government Urls listed,
IS YOURS?

Also in e.cfr.org

The Pyongyang Problem

If you are unable to see the message below, click here to view.

September 2017

Eyes on Asia

Blog Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube RSS

THE PYONGYANG PROBLEM

 

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (not pictured) guides the launch of a Hwasong-12 missile in this undated combination photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency on September 16, 2017. (KCNA/Reuters)

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (not pictured) guides the launch of a Hwasong-12 missile in this undated combination photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency on September 16, 2017. (KCNA/Reuters)

On September 3, 2017, North Korea tested its most powerful nuclear weapon yet: a hydrogen bomb with a one-hundred-kiloton yield, approximately seven times more powerful than the blast that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945. Less than two weeks later, Pyongyang conducted another test, this time firing a missile directly over Japan and triggering an emergency response from Tokyo. Despite (or perhaps because of) new UN sanctions on North Korea, Pyongyang has continued to issue dire threats—warning that it will employ nuclear weapons to “sink” Japan and reduce the United States to “ashes and darkness.” In light of Pyongyang’s sustained provocations, CFR experts continue to provide up-to-date insights on and analysis of the situation unfolding on the Korean peninsula.

 

 

Decision Time for the Trump Administration
Ely Ratner with Matthew Bell
KRT/Reuters  

KRT/Reuters

 

Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies Ely Ratner discusses the Donald J. Trump administration’s possible responses to the North Korea crisis in an interview with Public Radio International’s Matthew Bell on The World podcast.  Listen here »

 
North Korea and U.S. Go Head to Head
Scott A. Snyder
Lucas Jackson/Reuters  

Lucas Jackson/Reuters

 

Writing for ForbesSnyder dissects United States President Donald J. Trump's address to the United Nations, and the ensuing war of words with Kim Jong-un. Snyder argues that the risk of miscalculation and misunderstanding are higher than ever before, and that it is imperative Trump and Kim find a less public, less bombastic channel of communication.  Read more »

 
Japan Weighs Response to North Korea Missile Launch
Sheila Smith with Kelly McEvers
Issei Kato/Reuters  

Issei Kato/Reuters

 

Sheila A. Smith, CFR’s senior fellow for Japan studies, speaks with NPR’s Kelly McEvers on All Things Considered about the Japanese government’s response to North Korea’s missile launch over Japan and what it means for the United States and China. Listen or read the transcript here »

 
Russia and the North Korean Nuclear Challenge
Scott A. Snyder
Denis Balibouse/Reuters  

Denis Balibouse/Reuters

 

China is currently leading the response to North Korea’s nuclear development, while Russia is assuming a lesser role—a reversal from their leadership during the UN permanent five plus one (P5+1) talks with Iran. Scott A. Snyder, CFR’s senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy, writes about Russia’s strategy regarding the Korean peninsula in Asia Unbound.  Read more »

 
North Korea Gives Prime Minister Abe Boost on Defense
Sheila A. Smith, Jesse Johnson
Toru Hanai/Reuters  

Toru Hanai/Reuters

 

In an interview with the Japan Times’ Jesse Johnson about North Korea’s recent missile launch over Japan, Smith contends that a strong, unified response from Japan and the United States is needed if Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is to restore public faith in his leadership and in the United States’ commitment to Japan. At the time of writing, North Korea had fired two missiles over Japan in less than a month, the second of which was launched despite new UN sanctions. Read more »

 

Face-Off With China

Face-Off With China

Is Trump making China great again? Should the United States play hardball with China on trade? C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies Elizabeth C. Economy debated these questions and more with Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group; David Shambaugh, professor of political science and director of the China policy program at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs; and Noah Feldman, professor at Harvard Law School. Watch the Intelligence Squared U.S. debate here » (Photo: Intelligence Squared) 

 
 

DEMOCRACY AND DESTRUCTION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

The Rohingya Crisis: What Can Be Done
Joshua Kurlantzick
Danish Siddiqui/Reuters  

Danish Siddiqui/Reuters

 

UN Human Rights Chief Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein recently pointed to the ongoing Rohingya crisis in Myanmar’s Rakhine State as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Joshua Kurlantzick, CFR’s senior fellow for Southeast Asia, analyzes the situation and makes policy recommendations in Aspenia Online. Read more »

 
Why Aung San Suu Kyi Isn’t Protecting the Rohingya
Joshua Kurlantzick
Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters  

Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters

 

In a Washington Post article, Kurlantzick asks why Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate and symbol of democracy, has not done more to stop the widespread slaughter and displacement of Rohingya Muslims in her country.  Read more »

 
Bangladesh: Last Place of Refuge for Rohingya
Alyssa Ayres
Danish Siddiqui/Reuters  

Danish Siddiqui/Reuters

 

However bad conditions may be in Bangladeshi refugee camps and makeshift settlements, the Rohingya are running from worse. In an Asia Unbound post, Alyssa Ayres, senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, examines the Rohingya crisis as it spills over the border into Bangladesh.    Read more »

 
Political Turmoil in Thailand
Joshua Kurlantzick
Jorge Silva/Reuters  

Jorge Silva/Reuters

 

In his latest column for World Politics Review, Kurlantzick analyzes the tumultuous Thai political landscape in the wake of former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s move to flee the country. Kurlantzick argues that though the Shinawatra family may be down, their political party is not yet out.  Read more »

 
Southeast Asian Democracy in Decay
Joshua Kurlantzick
Romeo Ranoco/Reuters  

Romeo Ranoco/Reuters

 

From crackdowns on press and political opposition in Cambodia, to President Rodrigo Duterte’s violent drug war in the Philippines, to the brutality racking Myanmar, democracy in Southeast Asia has seen better days. Kurlantzick penned a two-part essay on Asia Unbound reflecting on the decline of democracy in Southeast Asia.  Read part one here »

 

CONVERSATIONS ON ASIA

China's Tightening Grip on Cyberspace
Adam Segal with Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn
Thomas White/Reuters  

Thomas White/Reuters

 

Adam Segal, Ira A. Lipman chair in emerging technologies and national security and director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy program, sat down with SupChina’s Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn to discuss China’s new cybersecurity law, its crackdowns on VPNs and foreign companies, and the country’s strengthening data nationalism. Listen to the podcast »

 
U.S. Grand Strategy in Asia Through the Centuries
Elizabeth C. Economy with Michael J. Green
China Stringer Network/Reuters  

China Stringer Network/Reuters

 

Michael J. Green, senior vice president for Asia and Japan chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and author of By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783, takes Economy on a historical journey, exploring the United States’ approach to Asia from naval historian Alfred Thayer Mahan to President Barack Obama. Listen to the podcast »

 
India’s Rise on the World Stage
Alyssa Ayres with Rosemary Barton
CBC  

CBC

 

Ayres joined Rosemary Barton on CBC’s Power and Politics to analyze India’s rise after seventy years of independence.  Watch here (22:05) »

 

Trump's Asia Policy

Trump's Asia Policy

Does the Trump administration have an Asia policy? In a piece for East Asia ForumSmith argues that it is increasingly likely that U.S. policy toward Asia will be reactive rather than prescriptive. However, in a Foreign Policy article, Ratner maintains that at least in the case of China, the State Department has not only developed a coherent policy, but has also been frighteningly accommodating (with the exception of a few mean tweets). Read Smith’s piece here and Ratner’s here » (Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters)

 

ASIA UNBOUND

 

The Asia Unbound blog examines political, economic, and social developments in Asia and the region’s central importance in global affairs.

 

 

 

ASIA ARTICLES

 
 
 

ABOUT THE ASIA PROGRAM


© 2017 All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0, except where otherwise stated | .gov.uk email communications

Email gcs@cabinet-office.gsi.gov.uk | GCS - 020 7276 2295

Marketing Direct Mag - © Crown copyright | All printing supplied by PrintUK.com | Part of Spamdex - the spam archive for the internet

E-Marketing Madness

  • Marketing Direct Magazine is here to bring you the latest news in marketing! Whether you\'re a marketing expert or wanting to bring a little bit more exposure to your company
  • Marketing Direct Magazine has the info you need.
  • We cover all aspects of marketing including Digital Marketing, both paid and unpaid search
  • With handy tips and tricks of the trade, we'll help you with: Researching marketing tactics
  • The Direct Marketing Association (UK) Ltd
  • Creating marketing plans and targets Implementing marketing plans

We have helpful advice from marketing experts across the globe, learn their tips and tricks and make your company more successful.