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Karen Bradley - Home Office

I am today publishing the independent review of the overseas domestic worker visa. The Government commissioned the report in March 2015 as part of its commitment to stop modern slavery in all its forms. James Ewins QC was asked to undertake an assessment of how far existing arrangements for the admission of overseas domestic workers are effective in protecting such workers from abuse and exploitation, and to make recommendations. The Government has now received the completed report, for which it thanks Mr Ewins, and is considering carefully the recommendations which it makes. The Governments response to the report will be announced in due course.

The report can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/home-office and a copy will be placed in the House Library.


Mike Penning - Home Office

I have today placed in the Library my proposals for the aggregate amount of grant to Local Policing Bodies in England and Wales for 2016/17, for the approval of the House. Copies are also available in the Vote Office.

On 25 November, the Chancellor announced that police spending would be protected in real terms over the Spending Review period, when precept is taken into account. This is an increase of up to 900 million in cash terms by 2019/20.

The Chancellors statement reinforces this Governments commitment to protect the public. That has been true over the last five years and remains the case for the coming Parliament. At the same time as protecting the overall spending envelope for the police, the Government committed to finishing the job of police reform.

Since 2010 we have seen some of the biggest changes to policing in a generation. Crime is down by over a quarter. There is significantly greater local accountability and transparency and police leaders have taken the opportunity to radically reform the way they deliver services to the public. Police officers have been taken out of back office roles and resources focused on front line delivery, putting officers back on the streets where the public expect them to be. Police forces are working more closely than ever before to reduce costs and duplication, and have started to work more closely with other emergency services through co-location and collaboration in areas such as fire and mental health.

But as Her Majestys Inspectorate of Constabulary has set out, there remain further efficiencies to be made from improved and better use of IT, from greater collaboration between forces and with other public services, and from improving workforce productivity. Better, more collaborative procurement alone can save the police up to 350m in real terms by 2019/20. We trust that Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and Chief Constables will do everything in their power to continue to drive those efficiencies, safeguard the quality of policing and continue to reduce crime.

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) will today publish proposals for the distribution of funding to English local authorities for 2016/17. A further 4.2m of Council Tax Freeze Grant funding, previously paid to Local Policing Bodies by DCLG, will be paid by the Home Office in 2016/17. This follows the permanent transfer of 500m of other Legacy Council Tax Grants and 3bn of formula funding from DCLG to the Home Office in previous years, reflecting our ambition to simplify police funding arrangements over this Parliament.

The Welsh Government set out its proposals for the allocation of funding in 2016/17 for Local Policing Bodies in Wales.

The overall settlement will increase counter-terrorism police funding in real terms to 670m and includes extra investment to continue the job of police reform. It provides transformation funding to develop and deliver specialist capabilities such as those required to tackle cyber crime and other emerging changes in crime, and enable a major uplift in firearms capability and capacity so that we can respond quickly and forcefully to a firearms attack. By protecting overall police spending, we will be able to deliver these changes and we will do so ensuring local identity and accountability is not lost in the process.

This settlement also includes within it the police share of the 1bn investment costs of the Emergency Services Network (ESN), demonstrating the importance the Government places on investing in ESNs future capability and confidence in the substantial financial savings it will deliver.

For 2016/17, direct resource funding for each PCC, including precept, will be protected at flat cash levels, assuming that precept income is increased to the maximum amount available. This means that no PCC will face a reduction in cash funding next year compared to this year, and the majority will see marginal increases in their spending power.

I have set out below how we propose to allocate the police funding settlement between the different funding streams and between police force areas for 2016/17.

Table 1: The 2015 Spending Review settlement for the police

15/16*

(m)

16/17

(m)

17/18

(m)

18/19

m)

19/20

(m)

Change

(m)

Cash change

(%)

Real change

(%)

Government Funding (excl CT)

8,271

8,378

8,497

8,631

8,785

514

6.2%

-1.4%

o/w Home Office

8,099

8,204

8,321

8,453

8,604

506

6.2%

-1.4%

o/w DCLG

37

37

37

37

37

0

0.0%

-7.2%

o/w Welsh Government

135

137

139

141

143

8

6.2%

-1.4%

Precept

3,105

3,194

3,286

3,379

3,474

369

11.9%

3.8%

Total

11,376

11,572

11,783

12,010

12,259

883

7.8%

0.0%

*Central government funding includes Airwave which has been brought into the police settlement and council tax freeze grant amounts which were not known at the time of the 2015/16 annual police settlement.

Table 2: Police revenue funding 2016/17

Police funding

16/17

m

Central Government funding*

8,995

o/w CT Police Grant**

640

o/w Airwave

204

o/w Police Private Finance Initiatives

73

o/w Legacy Council Tax Grants

545

Overall core Government settlement funding

7,534

Reallocations

218

o/w Direct Entry

4.6

o/w Emergency Services Network

80

o/w Independent Police Complaints Commission (for the transfer of integrity functions)

32

o/w Innovation Fund

55

o/w Major Programmes (HOB and NPDP)

21.8

o/w Special Grant

25

Transformation Fund

76

Total direct government funding

7,239

Government formula funding

7,061

cash change

-41

cash change percentage from 15/16

-0.6%

real change percentage

-2.3%

National & International Capital City Grants

178

o/w City of London Police

4.5

o/w Metropolitan Police

173.6

Precept

3,194

Overall resource funding***

10,978

cash change

51

cash change percentage

0.5%

real cut

-1.2%

*Includes 14m baseline adjustment for NCA in 2016/17. A separate baseline transfer has been applied for HMIC.

** Additional capital of 30m will be provided for CT policing.

***Comprises formula funding, NICC grants, Legacy Council Tax Grants and Precept

Detail of Police Transformation Fund (totals indicative):

Transformation Fund

76.4

o/w New Transformation Funding

37.8

o/w Firearms

34

o/w Digital justice (CJS)/digital investigations (DII)

4.6

Provisional force-level allocations of these grants (excluding Counter-Terrorism Police Grant) for each force area in England and Wales for 2016/17 are set out in Table 4. Further detail is set out below.

Counter-terrorism police funding

I will continue to allocate specific funding for counter-terrorism policing over the course of the Spending Review period to ensure that the police have the capabilities to deal with the terrorist threats that we face. The settlement will increase counter-terrorism police funding in real terms to 640m revenue. Additional capital of 30m will be provided.

Police and Crime Commissioners will receive full counter-terrorism funding allocations in the New Year. For security reasons these allocations will not be available in the public domain.

Baseline adjustments

Her Majestys Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC)

We will provide 9.2m to HMIC to continue its programme of thematic inspections and more wide-ranging PEEL inspections. The PEEL assessments are strong evidence of how HMIC shines a light on policing outcomes and value for money. They give the public a clear, independent view of the quality of policing in their local area. The public can use this information to challenge their local force and through their Police and Crime Commissioner, hold it to account. From 2016/17 this funding will form a permanent baseline transfer to HMIC.

In addition to ensuring that no force area will face a cash reduction in direct resource funding, I have also made funding available for a number of key priorities, set out below.

Reallocations

Emergency Services Network (ESN)

80m will be reallocated for ESN which will give all officers priority access to 4G mobile broadband data on a single network, including in some areas where it is currently not available at all, allowing them to get even more benefits from mobile working than many forces are already achieving. This investment will bring productivity and operational benefits as well as substantial savings to the taxpayer of around 400m per year, with the police accounting for around 260m of that saving.

Major Programmes

This year we will provide 21.8m from the police settlement to support the continuing development of Home Office Biometrics, a transformation programme looking to provide a single platform for all users (police, immigration and border, Counter Terrorism and Her Majestys Passport Office) for all three biometric platforms (fingerprint, DNA and face), and the National Police Database Programme that will develop a new national platform whose scope is likely to include that of the current Police National Computer, Police National Database and Automatic Number Plate Recognition systems.

Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC)

This is the third year of funding for the expansion of the IPCC to investigate all serious and sensitive allegations involving the police. At the midway point in 2015/16 the IPCC have opened more independent investigations than it delivered in the whole of 2014/15. In 2016/17 I am providing 32m from the police settlement to allow the IPCC to expand and focus on investigating the most serious and sensitive cases.

College of Policing

4.6m will be given to the College of Policing to deliver direct entry schemes. These schemes aim to attract, select and train exceptional people who have the potential to become senior leaders in policing. This will widen the talent pool from which police leaders can be drawn, open up police culture to new influences and foster an environment where challenge and innovation are welcome. Next year the College of Policing will be opening a new direct entry route in to policing at the rank of inspector to further open up policing ranks and encourage people from different stages in their careers to consider policing.

Police Special Grant

This is the second year we have decided to provide funding from the police settlement for the discretionary Police Special Grant contingency fund, which supports police force areas facing significant and exceptional events which might otherwise place them at financial risk. In 2016/17 I am providing 25m from the police settlement for Police Special Grant.

Police Innovation Fund

I will continue to promote innovation, collaboration and improved efficiency by allocating 55m to the Police Innovation Fund for 2016/17. This year, we want to reward more breakthrough ideas than ever before. We will continue to fund high-quality, large-scale, Implementation-Ready bids to bring innovation to life more quickly. But we are also looking for ideas for smaller-scale, early-stage, Proof-of-Concept bids to make ideas a reality, at scale and pace.

Police Transformation Fund

New Transformation Funding

After consideration, we are allocating 38m New Transformation Funding to incentivise and facilitate transformation in policing to invest in cross-force specialist capabilities, to exploit new technology and to improve how we respond to changing threats. Further details will be provided in the New Year.

Firearms capability and capacity

We will provide 34m to enable a national uplift in armed policing capability and capacity to respond more quickly and effectively to a firearms attack. This will be distributed via the Counter Terrorism Policing Grant.

Digital justice and digital investigations

I have decided to provide 4.6m for policing to begin the critical work of setting up a comprehensive, joined up programme of digital transformation. My priorities for digital policing reform can be divided into three component parts: public contact, digital investigation and intelligence and digital first. This reallocation will ensure these are established as funded programmes that can begin to deliver tangible results in 2016. Joining these together will not only ensure a consistent approach, but will also provide better value for money through economies of scale.

Other funding

National and International Capital City Grant

The Metropolitan Police, through the Greater London Authority, will receive National and International City (NICC) funding worth 174m, and the City of London Police will also receive increased NICC funding worth 4.5m. This is in recognition of the unique and additional demands of policing the capital city, and also ensures that total direct resource funding to both forces is similarly protected.

Council tax referendum principles

As announced as part of the Spending Review, additional flexibility will be given to the 10 PCCs in England with the lowest precept levels each year (the lower quartile), so that they can raise their precept by up to 5 per year per band D household. Other PCCs in England will face a 2.0% referendum threshold each year.

The PCCs to receive this 5 flexibility in 2016/17 are Northumbria, West Midlands, West Yorkshire, Sussex, Essex, Kent, Hertfordshire, South Yorkshire, Greater Manchester and Cheshire.

The Communities Secretary will announce the council tax referendum principles for local authorities in England in 2016/17 shortly. After considering any representations, he will set out the final principles in a report to the House and seek approval for these in parallel with the Final Local Government Finance Report. Council tax in Wales is the responsibility of Welsh Ministers.

Legacy Council Tax Grants

In 2016/17 we will provide Council Tax Freeze Grant to PCCs in England relating to the 2011/12, 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16 council tax freeze schemes and Local Council Tax Support (LCTS) funding previously paid to PCCs in England by DCLG. This will total 507m in 2016/17.

The Common Council of the City of London (on behalf of the City of London Police) and the Greater London Authority (on behalf of the Mayors Office for Policing and Crime) will also receive Council Tax Freeze Grant relating to the 2011/12 freeze grant scheme. The Greater London Authority will also receive an amount for the 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16 schemes. These sums will continue to be paid from outside of the police funding settlement by DCLG. There will be no new freeze grant schemes in 2016/17.

Police Capital

I still intend to allocate the majority of capital funding directly to Local Policing Bodies. Like last year all Local Policing Bodies will receive the same percentage change in Capital Grant. I will continue to maintain a capital contingency. Indicative figures are set out in Table 3, and I will consider whether further reallocations are required.

Table 3: Police Capital

2015/16 Police Capital

m

Police Capital Grant

64.5

Police Special Grant Capital

1

NPAS

16.5

Total

82

Table 4: Provisional revenue allocations for England and Wales 2016/17

Local Policing Body

2016/17

HO Core (incl Rule 1)

Welsh Top-up

WG

Ex-DCLG Formula Funding

Legacy Council Tax Grants (total from HO)

m

Avon & Somerset

105.0

-

-

56.5

14.7

Bedfordshire

40.3

-

-

23.3

4.6

Cambridgeshire

48.5

-

-

24.4

6.5

Cheshire

61.5

-

-

44.8

8.3

City of London

18.4

-

-

33.6

0.1

Cleveland

46.2

-

-

38.5

7.7

Cumbria

28.7

-

-

30.8

4.8

Derbyshire

62.1

-

-

37.7

8.7

Devon & Cornwall

102.7

-

-

63.1

15.5

Dorset

41.2

-

-

17.3

7.9

Durham

42.7

-

-

37.0

6.1

Dyfed-Powys

32.1

5.1

12.9

-

-

Essex

102.8

-

-

55.9

13.1

Gloucestershire

34.4

-

-

19.5

6.1

Greater London Authority

861.5

-

-

749.8

119.7

Greater Manchester

226.6

-

-

181.4

25.7

Gwent

42.4

-

30.1

-

-

Hampshire

120.0

-

-

63.1

12.9

Hertfordshire

71.4

-

-

36.4

10.2

Humberside

67.2

-

-

46.6

10.0

Kent

106.3

-

-

66.6

13.3

Lancashire

100.6

-

-

79.2

12.8

Leicestershire

65.3

-

-

39.6

8.9

Lincolnshire

38.4

-

-

20.3

6.8

Merseyside

122.5

-

-

112.8

15.6

Norfolk

50.2

-

-

28.8

9.3

North Wales

46.3

4.9

21.6

-

-

North Yorkshire

41.7

-

-

27.0

7.9

Northamptonshire

43.2

-

-

24.2

6.6

Northumbria

110.1

-

-

107.4

8.2

Nottinghamshire

77.9

-

-

48.1

9.7

South Wales

87.5

-

72.2

-

-

South Yorkshire

100.6

-

-

77.5

10.9

Staffordshire

66.5

-

-

39.9

12.0

Suffolk

40.7

-

-

22.9

6.8

Surrey

62.2

-

-

29.2

9.2

Sussex

97.8

-

-

53.9

13.2

Thames Valley

141.2

-

-

73.9

15.3

Warwickshire

31.0

-

-

17.4

5.2

West Mercia

66.3

-

-

43.4

12.0

West Midlands

250.8

-

-

180.3

19.0

West Yorkshire

171.5

-

-

129.3

16.7

Wiltshire

37.5

-

-

20.7

5.2

Total England & Wales

4112.0

9.9

136.8

2802.2

507.4

Table 5: Change in total direct resource funding*

Force area

2015/16

2016/17

Cash change

m

m

m

%

Avon & Somerset

269.3

270.7

1.4

0.5%

Bedfordshire

99.6

100.0

0.4

0.4%

Cambridgeshire

128.1

128.9

0.8

0.6%

Cheshire

169.5

170.9

1.4

0.8%

City of London

55.4

56.8

1.4

2.5%

Cleveland

122.3

122.5

0.3

0.2%

Cumbria

99.2

99.7

0.5

0.5%

Derbyshire

160.7

161.4

0.7

0.4%

Devon & Cornwall

278.0

279.5

1.5

0.5%

Dorset

118.4

119.3

1.0

0.8%

Durham

112.5

112.7

0.2

0.2%

Dyfed-Powys

93.3

94.1

0.8

0.8%

Essex

260.8

263.4

2.5

1.0%

Gloucestershire

104.3

105.1

0.8

0.8%

Greater London Authority

2,517.4

2,522.4

5.0

0.2%

Greater Manchester

541.2

542.9

1.7

0.3%

Gwent

117.8

118.5

0.7

0.6%

Hampshire

299.1

300.6

1.5

0.5%

Hertfordshire

181.1

182.9

1.8

1.0%

Humberside

169.4

169.8

0.5

0.3%

Kent

273.1

275.5

2.4

0.9%

Lancashire

258.9

259.5

0.6

0.2%

Leicestershire

167.7

168.5

0.7

0.4%

Lincolnshire

108.4

109.1

0.7

0.7%

Merseyside

307.0

307.0

0.0

0.0%

Norfolk

145.5

146.5

1.0

0.7%

North Wales

139.8

141.1

1.3

0.9%

North Yorkshire

137.1

138.2

1.1

0.8%

Northamptonshire

119.2

119.9

0.7

0.6%

Northumbria

259.5

260.3

0.8

0.3%

Nottinghamshire

188.9

189.5

0.6

0.3%

South Wales

255.1

256.5

1.5

0.6%

South Yorkshire

239.1

240.0

0.9

0.4%

Staffordshire

176.7

177.6

0.8

0.5%

Suffolk

110.9

111.6

0.6

0.6%

Surrey

205.0

207.1

2.1

1.0%

Sussex

249.7

252.1

2.5

1.0%

Thames Valley

369.7

371.9

2.2

0.6%

Warwickshire

89.5

90.1

0.6

0.7%

West Mercia

198.5

199.8

1.3

0.6%

West Midlands

522.8

524.0

1.2

0.2%

West Yorkshire

404.6

406.3

1.7

0.4%

Wiltshire

102.8

103.5

0.6

0.6%

TOTAL

10,927.0

10,977.8

50.8

0.5%

*This includes all formula grant, NICC grants and Legacy Council Tax Grants and police precept. This assumes that PCCs in England increase their precept to the maximum referendum limit in 2016/17, PCCs in Wales raise council tax by 2% and tax base growth of 0.5% across England and Wales.

 


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